Survival Basics Part 2 – Priority Breakdown

Survival Basics Part 2 – Priority Breakdown

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20 Comments

  1. Shelter*

  2. Could not agree more bro bushcraft, self-reliance, and survival are all 3 totally different animal's. don't get me wrong. they when used together can help each other. but at there core are completely different. you know I have watched every video you have made and agreed with you on this many times over but still I cant say enough how much I agree with your assessment of survival. great video bro this is the stuff that can save lives unlike the bullshit hype thy love to show on tv.

  3. Great video full of good stuff. Thanks for sharing with us.

  4. Great videos man i just started subscribing yesterday and i really like your videos, keep it up! Also what is the song in the ending called its very beutiful.

  5. Shelter is definitely #1. Exposure to the elements kills more people than anything else.

  6. How did you build that cabin?

  7. LiveFreeAndBushcraft

    What's Sheter??? lol

  8. I've always liked going off into the wilderness by myself, and telling anyone where I'll be is usually impossible because I don't have a clue.  I like areas where I don't have to follow trails, and where I have a chance of getting away from everyone.  Maybe even  chance of finding something no one has seen for centuries, if ever.  I also probably take more chances than I should.  Sometimes you have to take a chance to get to a specific area, or to explore something once you find it.  Because of this, I'm probably in a lot more danger than those who just stick to trails, or who tell someone where they'll be every minute.  o  prepare differently.  Primarily, though, I take these risks knowingly because that's what makes the wilderness worth seeing.    For me, as it seems to be for you, priority is about situation and location.

  9. My experience is that signaling works pretty darned well, even if you don't know SOS,  because most people who spend any time in the wild, and certainly conservation officers, and search and rescue,  should know that three of anything signals trouble.  If you hear three shots, it could just be three shots, but if you hear the three shots repeated, you need to check it out, or contact someone who will.  The same is true of fires, and of mirrors.  Three means trouble.   I know little about Maine, but I know signal mirrors have saved quite a few people out west, even when no one was yet looking for them.  Navigation doesn't mean much when you're seriously injured.  Nor does it mean much when someone has no clue how to navigate without a compass, and they lose their compass.

  10. GeorgiaFamily SouthernStyle

    Great Vid Sarge, I thought at one point while watching you, u were going to notice it lol.. it looks cold over there.. here in GA man we been being summer time , today it dropped to 30ish.. we gonna be getting the runny noises i guess..hey you and yours and ya boy have a merry christmas brother.. and happy new years …holler sometimes..

  11. This video is understandably simple. But I see the merit to it. K.i.s.s principle. It seems alot of videos tend to have a lengthy reasoning process. And why each priority should be the one you think of first. But it makes more sense in your adaptation of it. Because no two situations will be the same. Take for example winter. Where you are snow and blizzards being a factor to deal with alter how you view what you need. Versus where I live in the desert snow not being an issue. Unless of course mother nature decides to play a fun joke. It's more slush than snow and comes and goes quickly.That alters the way I view your list. So I like the simplicity of your thinking. And checked over the blog and bookmarked it to look over in more detail later. You and the family have a happy holidays..

  12. Great job bro! I have a standing friendly argument with a buddy that Shelter or cover should be made before fire. The scenario is a lost day hiker has no shelter finds himself in a rain storm with the first stages of hypothermia from the wind rain and temps. My thinking is that finding some sort of natural shelter or block from the wind and rain that will aid you in fire making and keeping your firewood dryer under cover as you collect it. His Idea is to make fire first and try to maintain it while making a shelter in the rain. Both work activities should aid in creating body heat. But anytime I go camping I set camp and then deal with the fire. Maybe its habit…lol Any thoughts?

  13. always enjoy your videos great bit of advice can't wait to see part 3

  14. I learned that the first principle should be to be self controlled and adaptable, i.e., have the right mind set to survive yourself or to help others survive. Your car may be broken down on a secondary road in the desert in mild weather, while off sight seeing, and your first priority may be water, but a fire may be very helpful to calm yourself or others in the car down emotionally–sitting around watching the red gods dance can be very comforting and let people get needed sleep even when not necessary for warmth! You may be dealing with emotional needs in addition to physical needs. I knew people who broke down on a secondary road in North Dakota in January during an exceptional bit of cold (even for N. Dakota) and carved up their spare tire for a fire when they were in doubt about the adequacy of their blankets, etc., which were plenty adequate for a less extreme night. No sense risking a chance of frostbite, or just being so worn down by a miserable sleepless night you risk bad decisions the next day, and so on. There are obvious situations calling for first aid above all other considerations, etc.–an axe cut can turn a camping trip into an emergency, and you have to have a state of mind ready to adapt immediately to that change in circumstances.

    This is what you really talked about, but it might help to make it explicit in your presentations. Great stuff as usual though!

  15. Lay's On Ferns Bushcraft & Survival

    Well said thanks for sharing I completely agree with you.

  16. Turtle Bushcraft

    great video lots of really good information atb John

  17. wildernesscamp 85

    Straight to the point with common sense logic. Thanks man

  18. I think a good sheter is very important!!!!

  19. spot on Sarge. One of the "Arts" of assessing your situation is knowing how to adjust your priorities based on what you find yourself. The core skills remain true, knowing when to prioritize them is the thing.

  20. good video brotha, good insight as always

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